Administration of Estates

This involves dealing with the property, money and personal possessions of a person who has died and distributing the estate to those persons entitled under the Will or intestacy of the deceased. Executors have duties that require them to manage the deceased’s affairs properly and deal with the Court and the Revenue.

We can offer sensitive specialist and practical advice on all aspects of Administration of Estates.

Wills and Probate law is a complicated area and if you have just suffered the death of a loved one, then dealing with the additional trauma of working through all the legal processes that surround wills and probate law is likely to be the last thing on your mind. The law in this area is complex and can be very time consuming and difficult to understand for anybody who does not have the proper legal training.

A last Will is an important document that comprises a set of binding instructions, to a person or persons that you trust and appoint as your executor(s), telling them how you want your property and estates dealt with after your death and who you want to benefit from it. The term ‘probate’, refers to the legal transfer of the deceased’s property, assets and personal effects to the beneficiaries listed in the Will.

It takes approximately 6-12 months to administer an Estate depending on the extent and complexity of the Estate.

There are two types of Estate Administration:

(1) Grant of Probate, provide there is a valid Will:

  • Details of the deceased’s assets and liabilities are collated and an assessment of the IHT liability is made.
  • The Grant of Probate is then applied for at the Probate Registry and sufficient copies of the Grant together with the will are returned to us for distribution among holders of the deceased’s assets and their creditors.
  • Monies are then collected in, creditors paid and distributions made to the beneficiaries in accordance with the will.

(2) Letters of Administration if the person died intestate (i.e. no Will was made):

  • A detailed family history is taken to ascertain who the beneficiaries of the estate will be in accordance with the Intestacy Rules.
  • Details of the deceased’s assets and liabilities are collated and an assessment of the IHT liability is made.
  • A letter of Administration is then applied for at the Probate Registry and sufficient copies of the Letter are returned to us for distribution among holders of the deceased’s assets and their creditors
  • Monies are then collected in, creditors paid and distributions made to the beneficiaries.

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